Snuggle Up

Making clothes really isn’t all that cost effective any more. With careful shopping and the use of discount codes, I can buy our clothes for quite a bit less than what materials and my time are worth. But, store bought clothes don’t really carry any sort of satisfaction, that feeling of a job well done keeping your family warm and comfortable. So, even though I can buy pjs for my son fairly inexpensively, I still love making pj bottoms for him.

Five new pairs of pj bottoms! So cozy!

Five new pairs of pj bottoms! So cozy!

I used Simplicity 2046, the same pattern I used several years ago to make a whole pj set for the little man when he was much littler. (I just make bottoms now since I can usually buy plain white tops for under $5 on sale.) The fabric is a selection of lightweight flannelette, bought on sale (of course) in lots of fun patterns.

A huge cuff so they will grow with the little man.

A huge cuff so they will grow with the little man.

I make use both my serger and my sewing machine, so I don’t need to worry about the fabric fraying at the seams. And, I leave very large hems in hopes that the bottoms will last a couple of winters.

Finished seams and a cute tag.

Finished seams and a cute tag.

The little tags at the rear waist help him put the pants on the right way around. I wish I could remember where I bought them, but I haven’t got a clue!

Do you sew simple, or even fancy, clothes? I’d love to hear all about it. I’m trying to get up the courage to try some more complex patterns. 😉

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Little Gingerbread Purse

I think one of the fun things about the holiday season is how much we can accessorize. Unlike most holidays, Christmas/New Years is celebrated pretty much throughout the whole of December and sometimes into January (depending on when you get to see your friends and family). And that is a lot of opportunity for making fun things for yourself.

Gingerbread Love Clutch, designed by Michele Cheong

Gingerbread Love Clutch, designed by Michele Cheong

I made this very cute Gingerbread Love Clutch, designed by Michele Cheong . The pattern is in the Festive 2013 issue of A Needle Pulling Thread, a wonderful Canadian magazine that covers all sorts of crafts. I picked up the kit from Michele at the Creativ Festival, so mine looks pretty close to the model in the magazine. Although I added a little gingerbread charm to the flap for a little bit of personalization instead of using lace like she did.

Gingerbread Love Clutch, designed by Michele Cheong

Gingerbread Love Clutch, designed by Michele Cheong

Although it isn’t really visible on the pictures, each little circle around the motifs is stitched around using pink DMC floss. Because the purse is lined with fleece, these little circles now puff out just a tiny bit. It is a really nice effect, and adds just a little bit of fanciness.

Be sure to come back tomorrow. I’m day 16 of Jo’s Online Advent Calendar, and I will be sharing a holiday project that I finally finished.

Creativ Festival Fall 2015 – Day 2

Today was the first full day of the Creativ Festival. Classes began at 9am and went all the way until 8pm. It takes a lot more energy than you would think to stitch, bead, sew, and craft all day. But this early into the festival we all mostly still have a lot of energy. 😉 Add to that game 5 in the Blue Jays/Rangers series, and it was an exciting day. (The baseball stadium is literally next door to the convention centre, and I can see it out my hotel room window. Also: yay!!!!!! Let’s go, Blue Jays!)

Geisha Clutch, designed by Edith Kauffeldt

Geisha Clutch, designed by Edith Kauffeldt

My first class of the day was Geisha Clutch with Edith Kauffeldt of Sew Have Fun. The project was a lovely little clutch/wallet that worked up much more quickly than I expected. I left out the id pocket because I didn’t want to stitch on vinyl with the terrible sewing machines we had, and I also don’t really like id pockets. I’m still super pleased with the final result, and I can see myself making more of these, perhaps with a few minor variations.

Geisha Clutch, designed by Edith Kauffeldt (interior)

Geisha Clutch, designed by Edith Kauffeldt (interior)

Edith taught us a little tip for adding zippers to items where the zipper could be visible on the side. She wraps the end of the zipper, like you do when the ends are left loose, and then sews it into the side seam as per usual. It makes for a much nicer look on the side of bag. That tip was worth the price of the class. 😉

Icy Ornament, designed by Carol Storie of Heartfelt Designs

Icy Ornament, designed by Carol Storie of Heartfelt Designs

My evening class was Icy Ornament with Carol Storie of Heartfelt Designs. It has a centre snowflake worked in #8 braid, surrounded by a bargello border worked in DMC Color Variations #8 perle cotton. The fabric is a super sparkly congress cloth. The whole piece is just lovely, and it will shine so nicely on my Christmas tree. It might even end up there is year since I managed to finish my piece in class.

Speaking of finishing things, I’m 3 for 3. I had a bit free time this afternoon, so I finished up yesterday’s Precious Jewel piece. Check out my Twitter feed for pictures.

Tomorrow is yet another full day: broomstick crochet in the morning, a needlecase in the afternoon, and a biscornu in the evening.

Sewing Set Finish

Sometimes I just don’t get around to posting things when I should. I finished this sewing set back in December. Yes, almost six months ago. I finally took a picture of it in April. Yes, a month ago. But, here it is!

Sewing Trio, designed by Heidi Boyd for Craftsy

Sewing Trio, designed by Heidi Boyd for Craftsy

This was a kit from Craftsy: Sewing Trio. It consists of a drawstring bag with exterior pockets, a little bird-shaped needle book, and a rectangular pin cushion with a small pocket. The kit is no longer available, but you can get the pattern as a workshop. (I sewed this using the instructions included in the kit. I did not buy the workshop.)

I’m very pleased with how it turned out. The fabric is bright and cheerful, and also of nice quality. The instructions were sufficient, but could have been more detailed in some areas. (I suspect that if paired with the workshop, the problem spots would have been much easier to figure out.) I think the only thing I would change would be to somehow add some weight to the pin cushion so that it feels a little more substantial.

Sewing PJs

Unfortunately, I have broken my sewing machine again… I finished up a couple of big projects and decided to change the needle. Well, I didn’t tighten the screw enough, and the needle popped out and punched holes in my bobbin case. :/

Poor, perforated bobbin case.

Poor, perforated bobbin case.

So, I won’t be sewing for a little while. But, at least I was able to finish up some PJ pants for the little man before the disaster happened.

A pile of pj bottoms

A pile of pj bottoms

I used some light flannel, which is nearly always on sale at Fabricland for as low as $3 or $4/metre. The pattern is Simplicity 3669, which includes several different tops as well. But, when there is a sale, I can get plain white tops for as low as $3, so I figured my time was better spent sewing up the bottoms since they work up so quickly. I do the seams on my serger, and then finish up the hems and zipper casing/waistband on my sewing machine.

pjlabelI added cute little tags to the back of the waist to help the little man make sure they go on the right way.

pjhemAnd I made extra deep hems since he seems to be growing taller much quicker than he is growing wider. I’ll pick these out in the fall and let them down, and we should get another winter out of all four pairs.

Do you sew pjs, or any clothes, for yourself or someone else? I’d love to know.